Briefly Reviews

Succinct, meaningful reviews

We are always looking for new writing to review. If you would like to request a review of your book / collection / pamphlet / journal, please contact contact@brieflywrite.com or fill out the form below. Include a brief synopsis (or link to where we can read one) and any other relevant details.


Latest Reviews

What comes before after?

Afterglow by Michelle Marie Jacquot is an introspective romp through the dark, twisting halls of the inner mind

Whispered Screams

Keely O’Shaugnessy’s short stories take the reader through scenes of horror and hope. Screams are whispers and whispers screams…


All Reviews

  • What comes before after?
    Afterglow by Michelle Marie Jacquot is an introspective romp through the dark, twisting halls of the inner mind
  • Whispered Screams
    Keely O’Shaugnessy’s short stories take the reader through scenes of horror and hope. Screams are whispers and whispers screams…
  • ‘It seems that I find myself coming out/ as biracial’
    Younge’s poetic space is a multitude of multitudes. Her language is constantly evolving, while the self shifts incessantly
  • Alone and alive
    Sweetgum County is both a magnet and a vacuum. The reader too will be pulled back for more.
  • Myth and micro fiction
    Lyrical and energetic, the novella expertly intertwines myth and history
  • Words + Shapes = Poetry
    Kelly reconciles mathematics and poetry, science and art, logic and creativity, and demonstrates that what falls under these labels should not so hastily be kept apart.
  • Ships, salt and a social conscience
    The inaugural issue of Seaborne Magazine is a treasure trove of writing and artwork inspired by the sea. Beautifully crafted, the magazine celebrates the maritime in all its glory
  • Cycles, signs and silence
    In her second micro collection, Laura Besley weaves together one hundred stories of one hundred words to create one neatly jumbled narrative web.
  • A (blue) light at the end of the tunnel
    Jacquot’s style is intuitive and unpretentious. The verse is sparse and free of decorative adornment, which allows her words to cut through the noise of the internet age.
  • Dreams and beyond
    Leung has a delicate and subtle touch for sound and its limitations. The dreamer is aware of ‘bendy silence’ and of her ‘eyes ticking, ticking like the / black time’.
  • Knees and never-endings
    The language is at times haunting, at times beautiful, but never static.
  • Just a Kid from Cortonwood
    Mick’s authentic voice is heard in every line, swinging from angry to tender, at once bleak and life-affirming. These are poems that demand to be read aloud

See older reviews here.


If you would like to request a review, please email contact@brieflywrite.com or fill in this form.